Remy Porter

Remy is a veteran developer who provides software for architectural installations with IonTank.

He's often on stage, doing improv comedy, but insists that he isn't doing comedy- it's deadly serious. You're laughing at him, not with him. That, by the way, is usually true- you're laughing at him, not with him.

Last One In

by in CodeSOD on

A lesson that everyone learns at some point is "don't write your own authentication code." Authentication, like encryption, and like dates, is incredibly complex and has all sorts of ways you can subtly mess it up and not realize your mistake.

Take, for example, this code from Christopher. His peer wrote this code, added a single test record to the database, saw that it worked, and called it a day.


Double Your Value

by in CodeSOD on

There are many ways to debug your code. You might use an actual graphical debugger, wrestle with GDB, just spam print statements, or rely on a logging framework to help you generate useful diagnostic output.

Since you're going to need some logging output no matter what, it's always good to heavily instrument your code. Using logging levels, you can control quite well what gets dumped when. Well, "LostLozz" had a co-worker who found an… interesting way to control logging.


The Secret to Success

by in CodeSOD on

"I was once working for a company that primarily dealt with Oracle products," Tai writes.

That vendor, who shall not be named again, provided an installer. Tai ran it, and it failed. Since the installer was a shell script, she opened up the file and took a look.


A Terned Around Discount

by in CodeSOD on

If you browse the Errords, it's easy to see that "giving customers a discount" is apparently harder than it looks.

Brian's company had one of those "discounts are hard" problems, way back when. Sometimes instead of a discount reducing the price, it would raise it. The root cause was that the sales team setting up the promotions weren't clear about whether the discount amount should be a negative or positive number. Instead of adding validation to ensure they always entered a negative (or at least, a zero amount), one of Brian's predecessors fixed the bug in their C# like this:


A Bit of Power

by in CodeSOD on

Powers of two are second nature to a lot of programmers. They're nearly inescapable.

Equally inescapable are programmers finding new ways to do simple things wrong. Take Sander's co-worker, who needed to figure out, given a number of bits, what's the largest possible value you could store in that number of bits. You or I might reach for our language's pow function, but boy, in C++, that might mean you need to add an include file, and that sounds hard, so let's do this instead:


A Lack of Progress

by in CodeSOD on

Progress bars and throbbers are, in theory, tools that let your user know that a process is working. It's important to provide feedback when your program needs to do some long-running task.

Hegel inherited a rather old application, written in early versions of VB.Net. When you kicked off a long running process, it would update the status bar with a little animation, cycling from ".", to "..", to "...".


Self-Documented

by in CodeSOD on

Molly's company has a home-grown database framework. It's not just doing big piles of string concatenation, and has a bunch of internal checks to make sure things happen safely, but it still involves a lot of hardcoded SQL strings.

Recently, Molly was reviewing a pull request, and found a Java block which looked like this:


The Timing is Off

by in Error'd on

Drew W discovers that the Daytona 500 is a different kind of exciting than we ever thought.

XXX Wins the Daytona 500


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