Where to go, Next?

by in Error'd on

"In this screenshot, 'Lyckades' means 'Succeeded' and the buttons say 'Try again' and 'Cancel'. There is no 'Next' button," wrote Martin W.


A Generic Comment

by in CodeSOD on

To my mind, code comments are important to explain why the code what it does, not so much what it does. Ideally, the what is clear enough from the code that you don’t have to. Today, we have no code, but we have some comments.

Chris recently was reviewing some C# code from 2016, and found a little conversation in the comments, which may or may not explain whats or whys. Line numbers included for, ahem context.


A Random While

by in CodeSOD on

A bit ago, Aurelia shared with us a backwards for loop. Code which wasn’t wrong, but was just… weird. Well, now we’ve got some code which is just plain wrong, in a number of ways.

The goal of the following Java code is to generate some number of random numbers between 1 and 9, and pass them off to a space-separated file.


A Cutt Above

by in CodeSOD on

We just discussed ViewState last week, and that may have inspired Russell F to share with us this little snippet.

private ConcurrentQueue<AppointmentCuttOff> lstAppointmentCuttOff { get { object o = ViewState["lstAppointmentCuttOff"]; if (o == null) return null; else return (ConcurrentQueue<AppointmentCuttOff>)o; } set { ViewState["lstAppointmentCuttOff"] = value; } }

Exceptional Standards Compliance

by in CodeSOD on

When we're laying out code standards and policies, we are, in many ways, relying on "policing by consent". We are trying to establish standards for behavior among our developers, but we can only do this with their consent. This means our standards have to have clear value, have to be applied fairly and equally. The systems we build to enforce those standards are meant to reduce conflict and de-escalate disagreements, not create them.

But that doesn't mean there won't always be developers who resist following the agreed upon standards. Take, for example, Daniel's co-worker. Their CI process also runs a static analysis step against their C# code, which lets them enforce a variety of coding standards.


Just a Trial Run

by in Error'd on

"How does Netflix save money when making their original series? It's simple. They just use trial versions of VFX software," Nick L. wrote.


Configuration Errors

by in Feature Articles on

Automation and tooling, especially around continuous integration and continuous deployment is standard on applications, large and small.

Paramdeep Singh Jubbal works on a larger one, with a larger team, and all the management overhead such a team brings. It needs to interact with a REST API, and as you might expect, the URL for that API is different in production and test environments. This is all handled by the CI pipeline, so long as you remember to properly configure which URLs map to which environments.


Get My Switch

by in CodeSOD on

You know how it is. The team is swamped, so you’ve pulled on some junior devs, given them the bare minimum of mentorship, and then turned them loose. Oh, sure, there are code reviews, but it’s like, you just glance at it, because you’re already so far behind on your own development tasks and you’re sure it’s fine.

And then months later, if you’re like Richard, the requirements have changed, and now you’ve got to revisit the junior’s TypeScript code to make some changes.


Archives